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1st Winner | 1697 Votes

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History of Dandiya

Dandiya, commonly known as ‘Dandiya Raas,’ is a Gujarati folk dance. Dandiya began in India and dates back to a time when dances in the shape of Garba were performed in honour of Goddess Durga. 

In India, it is believed that Dandiya portrays a mock fight between Durga and Mahishasura, with sticks of Dandiya representing Goddess Durga’s sword, and is done after the Garba. Dandiya is also related to Lord Krishna’s Raas Lila and the Gopiyan women. 

Dandiya is a Navratri dance done in groups by men and women dressed in colourful costumes. It is gradually gaining popularity in the Gujarati community all across the world.

Why Dandiya is Special?

People dress up in their finest traditional Gujarati costume and prepare some of the most exquisite Gujarati traditional dishes, all while expressing genuine appreciation to the goddess and guardian of the earth. Swaying with a pair of Dandiya sticks in your hand and moving to the beat of the music is a great way to dance.

How Dandiya is very Auspicious?

This dance, performed by men and women dancing in concentric rounds around the figure of Goddess Durga in the centre, is relatively easy to learn than other traditional Indian dance forms. This is a unique component of the evening Navratri ceremony. Women dance in a straightforward move while whirling around the mandvi in a smooth manner.

The sticks are held in both hands, and men and women touch them at regular intervals, producing not only a fascinating visual but also a very lovely sound to the ears. One of the circles rotates clockwise, while the other rotates anticlockwise. The sight of dancers rotating in circles is definitely a rhythmically awe-inspiring sight.